Articles

Freedom from Hunger is committed to sharing what we learn with the rest of the field. Our expert staff members are regularly called upon to contribute commentary, articles and chapters for trade publications, technical journals and books.

We are pleased to provide the following list of published works authored or co-authored by Freedom from Hunger staff, past and present. These articles are generally available for free download in PDF format or via links to other websites. In some cases, articles have been published by journals that provide access only by subscription or purchase.

The titles are listed according to the date of publication, starting with the most recent articles. We provide complete citation information for the convenience of researchers wanting to cite the publication in their own work and provide access to French or Spanish versions, when available.

We sincerely hope you will find these articles useful for broadening your understanding of value-added microfinance and related topics.

The road to client assessment: Travel tips.

Loupéda, Christian and Bobbi Gray. SEEP Network Practitioner Learning Program Putting Client Assessment to Work, Technical Note #1. 28pp. (April 2006). Washington DC: SEEP Network. (English Only)

Get the article at SEEP Network (link will open in a new window).

Abstract

Advocating a complete management information system to track the achievement of financial, institutional and social objectives, this paper discusses tracking systems to monitor progress made by the institution towards achieving program objectives.

Toward a complete progress tracking system.

Toward a complete progress tracking system. Dunford, Christopher. SEEP Network Progress Note No. 9. 6pp. (June 2005). (English Only)

Get the article at Microfinance Gateway (link will open in a new window).

Abstract

Advocating a complete management information system to track the achievement of financial, institutional and social objectives, this paper discusses tracking systems to monitor progress made by the institution towards achieving program objectives.

Poverty scorecards: Lessons from a microlender in Bosnia-Herzegovina.

Schreiner, Mark, Michal Matul, Ewa Pawlak and Sean Kline. 41pp. (December 2004). (English Only)

Get the article at Microfinance Gateway (link will open in a new window).

Abstract

How poor are participants in development projects? This paper analyzes how well a simple scorecard identifies poor clients at a microlender in Bosnia-Herzegovina. The scorecard effectively ranks clients by relative poverty and also identifies the likelihood that a client is poor by an absolute standard.

Adding value to microfinance and to public health education—at the same time.

Dunford, Christopher. ADB Finance for the Poor (a quarterly newsletter of the Focal Point for Microfinance), 4 (4): 1–4. (December 2003). (English Only)

Abstract

The impact research in Ghana reinforced by the operations research in the Philippines shows that public health and microfinance objectives can be achieved at the same time with the same staff through careful integration of education and financial service delivery.

Using microfinance to improve health and nutrition security.

Dunford, Christopher and Barbara MkNelly. Global HealthLink (News Magazine of the Global Health Council), 118:9, 22. (November–December 2002). (English Only)

Abstract

The impact evaluation research in Ghana provides evidence that microfinance and health/nutrition education services, provided together by the same field officer to groups of women, can alleviate poverty, improve health/nutrition knowledge and practice, empower women, and ultimately improve household food security and children’s nutritional status.

Improving design and performance of group lending: Suggestions from Burkina Faso.

MkNelly, Barbara and Michael Kevane. World Development, 30(11):2017–2032. (November 2002) DRAFT. (English Only)

Get the article through World Development via Science Direct (link will open in a new window).

Abstract

We summarize lessons learned by a credit program for women in Burkina Faso. Three observations are made regarding program design: 1) high membership turnover means mutual guarantee groups should be smaller and more central to non-repayment penalties; 2) high turnover in economic activities implies more training in best practices and more variety and experimentation in credit and savings mechanisms; and 3) high degrees of stocking activity suggests the need to develop instruments to mitigate commodity price risk at the individual and program level.

Credit with Education impact review no. 2: Economic capacity and security.

MkNelly, Barbara and Mona McCord. 23pp. (September 2002). (English and Spanish)

PACTS’s women’s empowerment program in Nepal: A savings- and literacy-led alternative to financial building.

Ashe, Jeffrey and Lisa Parrott. Journal of Microfinance. 4(2):137–162. (Fall 2002).(English only)

Building better lives: Sustainable integration of microfinance with education in child survival, reproductive health, and HIV/AIDS prevention for the poorest entrepreneurs.

Dunford, Christopher. Chapter Two in Sam Daley-Harris, ed., Pathways Out of Poverty: Innovations in Microfinance for the Poorest Families, 75–131. (2002). Bloomfield, CT: Kumarian Press. (English Only)

What’s wrong with loan size?

Dunford, Christopher. Freedom from Hunger discussion paper. 7pp. (2002). (English Only)

Get the article at Microfinance Gateway (link will open in a new window).

Abstract

Can an average loan size proxy can be maintained? This discussion paper argues very strongly that the average loan size proxy for depth of outreach being used by USAID is grossly inadequate.

Pages

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