Articles

Freedom from Hunger is committed to sharing what we learn with the rest of the field. Our expert staff members are regularly called upon to contribute commentary, articles and chapters for trade publications, technical journals and books.

We are pleased to provide the following list of published works authored or co-authored by Freedom from Hunger staff, past and present. These articles are generally available for free download in PDF format or via links to other websites. In some cases, articles have been published by journals that provide access only by subscription or purchase.

The titles are listed according to the date of publication, starting with the most recent articles. We provide complete citation information for the convenience of researchers wanting to cite the publication in their own work and provide access to French or Spanish versions, when available.

We sincerely hope you will find these articles useful for broadening your understanding of value-added microfinance and related topics.

Village banking: The state of the practice.

Nelson, Candace, Barbara MkNelly, Kathleen Stack and Lawrence Yanovitch (with assistance from the Poverty Lending Working Group of SEEP and participants at the International Conference of Village Bank Practitioners). Ana Maria Brasileiro, ed. Small Enterp

Get the publication at Seep Network (link will open in a new window).

Abstract

This paper is the culmination of a multi-year, collaborative learning program focused on village banking. The process has been sponsored by the Small Enterprise Education and Promotion (SEEP) Network and its Poverty Lending Working Group.

Together they function as a forum for practitioner exchange to share program experience and analyze key program issues.  As village banking attracts more attention throughout the world, the insights and solutions they have found to improve their own programs should also benefit those undertaking new initiatives.

Health and Microfinance: Leveraging the Strengths of Two Sectors to Alleviate Poverty

Metcalfe, Marcia, M. Gash, B. Gray, M. Reinsch Sinclair, C. Chandler, C. Dunford, S. Leatherman. 2012. The Journal of Social Business, 2 (1), 26-44.

Abstract

Freedom from Hunger and five microfinance institutions (MFIs) from Benin, Bolivia, Burkina Faso, India, and the Philippines tested whether MFIs could sustainably offer health-related services with positive health and social impacts for client. The health services ranged from education, health-financing (loans, savings and microinsurance), to linkages to health providers and health products.
Impact research included client interviews; focus-group discussions; a randomised controlled trial; and cost-benefit analyses at the institutional level. Positive benefits were detected at the client and household levels, including improved health knowledge andbehaviours, and in access to health services and products. These findings support the idea that MFIs offer large and growing distribution networks that can provide an integrated set of services to improve both health and financial security of poor families.

A two-pronged approach : Microfinance can be leveraged to address health care expenditure for the poor

Bindu Shajan Perappadan. The Hindu (July 2012).

Read the full article at The Hindu (link will open in a new window).

Abstract

Intro

Indian microfinance institutions (MFI) currently serve 71 million rural poor. Pairing financial services with access to life saving health interventions such as health financing, telemedicine and other innovations has tremendous potential. But it requires further commitment and resources to reach scale. An international development organisation, Freedom from Hunger notes in a report on `Integrated Health and Microfinance in India: Harnessing the strengths of two sectors to improve health and alleviate poverty’. The report was recently released along with the Microcredit Summit Campaign and the Indian Institute of Public Health, Gandhinagar.

Why Not Add Health to Microfinance?!

Chandler, Cassie. CGAP—Microfinance Gateway (June 2012).

Read or download the article at the CGAP—Microfinance Gateway site (link will open in a new window).

Abstract

Intro

In addition to being keenly aware of their financial bottom line, many microfinance institutions (MFIs) strive to uphold a social mission. These need not be mutually exclusive.

Adding health to microfinance speaks to the social mission, but can also improve client loyalty and competitive advantage, and be simple and low-cost. Some MFIs shy away from integrating health, as it sounds daunting and complex; however, there is no need for it to be.

Integrated Health and Microfinance in India: Harnessing the Strengths of Two Sectors to Improve Health and Alleviate Poverty. State of the Field of Integrated Health and Microfinance in India, 2012

Metcalfe, Marcia (Freedom from Hunger). Somen Saha (India Institute of Public Health, Ghandinagar), D.S.K. Rao (Microcredit Summit Campaign), Kathleen Stack (Freedom from Hunger) and Anna Awimbo (Microcredit Summit Campaign). 28pp. (June 2012). Washington

Freedom from Hunger Savings Group News

Freedom from Hunger Staff, May 2012.

AIM Youth Newletter (1st Edition 2012)

Freedom from Hunger, AIM Youth team.

Confessions of Two Adult Educators—It's harder than it looks, but the payoff is priceless when done right.

Francois, Edouine and Maria Matilde Olazabal. Monday Developments, Vol. 29, Issue 11, pgs 21-23. (November 2011)

Read or download the article at Interaction's Monday Developments Magazines (link will open in a new window).

Abstract

Intro

Have you ever watched some -one make a great discovery? Maria Matilde Olazabal did in Chiapas,
Mexico, while training a group of Chamula women to explore different ways they could improve their savings and define their own saving goals. One woman turned to the group and said, “What we are doing here is dreaming that we can reach anything with our own effort. I am not used to dreaming. I like it!”...

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