Improving on the "Old Way" If not for her sister-in-law, a woman who voluntarily organizes village women in savings and loan groups, Aminata Diarra may not have found her way into group banking. “She convinced me to try it,” nods the 54-year-old widow and mother. “Otherwise, I might not have done it.” Read More...
Change Happens in a Country Village Growing up in the same village in which she has always lived, Assa Fofana saw her father die young, but the family managed to muddle along. “Even the tiniest amount of money went a long way,” she recalls, unlike these days of high expenses. As a child, Assa sold a lot of boiled yams at the market. Read More...
Tools to Become Self-Reliant Fatoumata Monomata lives in Burkina Faso, one of the poorest countries in the world, with an average life expectancy of 44 years.

Ever since Fatoumata was a child herself, she has known about a terrible disease called malaria. But she and her neighbors didn't know how it was spread, how to protect themselves from it or, when it would strike, what kind of medicine would help.
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Patience is One in a Million In her rural village in Ghana, Patience Ameyaw did what every other young woman in her village did: marry, have children, and work every day to feed them.

To help her family, Patience used a foot-powered sewing machine to make simple shirts and skirts that she sold to others in her village.
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Rita’s Story: No More "Hungry Season" Good credit. A savings account. The knowledge to use money wisely. It’s the recipe for financial security. In rural Ghana, West Africa, the recipe is the same, but the proportions are very different from the ones you and I know. It takes so little in a place like this…so little to make a life-and-death difference. Read More...
Acquiring Skills, Knowledge,
and Confidence
Young Mohima strolls through her village, along with a few of her friends, including a woman she affectionately calls Anwara Didi—or big sister. Anwara, a native of the area, is a recruiter and counselor for Freedom from Hunger's Learning Conversations program. Read More...
"Doctor Mom"
Brings Healthcare to Her Rural Village
Several years ago, when Nandini Nath needed cash to buy seeds and pesticides for her barley and potato crops, her only option was to take a loan from her local loan shark, who charged her 60% interest. She took the loan because she didn’t have any other option. Read More...
Grateful for Life-Saving Education In 2004, Freedom from Hunger formed partnerships with several organizations to bring its services to India where approximately 300 million people live below the poverty line. While most people think of India’s poverty as primarily urban, the true extent of hunger and malnutrition can only be seen in rural areas where poverty is deeper. Read More...
Carmen’s Story: A Mother’s Dream Fulfilled For Carmen Rosa Galvez, life had always been hard. Raising her family on the outskirts of a slum area in the highlands of Peru, Carmen spent 10 years carving local stone into small statues. Because she had no stall at the craft market, she had to rely on others to sell her crafts and share the profit with her. On those days, she and her three children ate well. But on days when Carmen could not find a vendor to help, her family went hungry. Read More...
Earning and Learning More In the highlands of Mexico, 25-year-old Julia Mendez Bautista lives a simple life. She works every day to earn money to feed, clothe and shelter her three children. Because she never learned to read or write, Julia’s options for earning money have been limited. She relies on the craft-making skills her mother taught her to make bracelets for the tourist trade. Read More...
More Than A Loan More than 25 million people live in rural Mexico and 57 percent of them live in poverty. Nearly 30 percent live in extreme poverty. Where Graciela Saavedra lives, there is no social safety net to care for women in her situation; she is widowed and in fragile health. Her husband had no pension to leave her and wage-earning jobs are hard to come by, even for younger, stronger, more educated people. Read More...
Sebastiana’s Story of Hope Sebastiana has known nothing but poverty her entire life. She lost her husband a few years ago and was left alone to care for her nine children in the difficult environment of the high Peruvian plains. And yet she has hope for the future. Read More...
Sofia’s Story of Perseverance For Sofia Quispe, managing many things at once is simply normal. At 30 years old, she has accumulated quite a bit of wisdom to complement the determination that comes naturally to her. She was born and raised in San Martin Porras in the district of Huancavelica, a poor rural community in the mountains of Peru. Read More...
A Mother’s Hope If you ever find yourself driving just northeast of Mexico City and in need of a snack, stop by Santa Maria and look for Yolanda’s small store. She calls it “Mi Esperanza,” My Hope, after her mother-in-law, who is named Esperanza, loaned her money four years ago to open the place. Yolanda sells drinks, water, an array of chips and candy, and basic household items. She’s got an arcade game in need of repair, and a telephone for hire. Read More...